Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Corn Sheller WWW

Thanks to all who stopped by to join in last Wednesday!

Here's hoping some of you might join me in posting a story with a picture for Wednesday Wit and Wisdom.  The challenge is to post a picture, then write a short story or a poem about the picture.  When you have your story written, you can link up for others to read.  Feel free to also add your picture and story to another link of your choice. The link up is on my WWW page here.

Here's my picture story for this week.


Say "hi" to Delmar. In this picture Delmar is about forty years old. From the corn growing in the background, you may have already guessed he is a farmer.

The vehicle he is next to is a corn sheller. So now I need to explain what this contraption is all about.

Many years ago, the field corn was harvested in the ear with a corn picker and stored on the cob in big corn cribs, where it could continue to dry from the harvest. In order to get the corn back out of the corn crib, it was important to have a mechanized way of doing this.

Now Delmar was a very creative and inventive individual. He worked with another man to develop a system of augers that would pull the corn from underneath the crib and into this machine, which would then strip the corn off the cobs. The arm you see on the left of the picture is the spout where the corn would exit into a waiting truck to be taken to market, and the bag on the right was the exit for the chaff and debris. Another spout would send out the cobs into a waiting two-ton truck to be used for other purposes. In the evenings during this season, he would call all his scoopers, truckers, etc., to get them lined up, then be busy maintaining his equipment to be in top-top shape for the three to four hour event. Other farmers hired him for this work, and he eventually had two corn shellers available.

Most of the work with the corn sheller could be done in the off season, so that he could spend the planting and harvesting seasons with his farming. Several years later, Delmar was one of the first to invest in a self-propelled combine that would harvest and shell the corn in the field. And of course he would be for hire to other farmers for this purpose as well. Farming was not always a lucrative business, especially if the farmer was share cropping. Delmar found other resources to provide for his family, which was his greatest source of pride. Yet he was a gentle soul who got tears in his eyes watching a touching scene on Bonaza on a Saturday night. I loved him dearly.....he was my daddy.

Now it's your turn. Got a great picture to tell a story about? Just join in below. Have a wonderful hump day!

Linda Kay 

18 comments:

Mascha said...

What a lovely memory about a great and creative farmer.
Greetings from Germany

Mike said...

I think you snuck in a personal story on 'Wednesday Wit and Wisdom'.

Romi C said...

Thank you for sharing your story of your father.

Josie Two Shoes said...

What a wonderful, sweet story Linda! You are a farm kid after my own heart! Both of my parents were farm kids in Dakota, and my Dad was a John Deere dealer. Our lives depended on the farmers... and the weather! Looks like your Dad was pretty clever to invent such a wonderful machine to make his life a little easier!

Gail said...

Wonderful story. Farmers are an inventive group.

fishducky said...

You have been a regular & welcome commentor on my blog--I don't know how I missed following yours. I remedied that--I am your newest follower!!

TexWisGirl said...

awww. this was precious!

and i remember a big corn crib on the dairy farm where i lived my first 13 yrs of life...

Gosia k said...

interesting story

fishducky said...

I knew there were corn sellers, corn spellers & even corn corn smellers, but I had never heard of a corn sheller!!

Cherdo said...

Necessity is the mother of invention, eh, Linda? Lovely story.

Linda said...

Such a lovely story, Linda!

Far Side of Fifty said...

We sat in the corn crib and shelled by hand into a bucket, then it was ground. Great photo and story, farmers worked hard! :)

William Kendall said...

There was a farmer across the road who grew corn where I grew up, so we were quite used to seeing the crop grow through the summer.

Big Sky Heidi said...

He was certainly very creative.

Josie Two Shoes said...

My first link up has an error in the address so the link doesn't work, I just added the correct one, please delete the first one! :-)

The Yum List said...

Until today I didn't even know there was a machine called a 'corn sheller' .

Amy at love made my home said...

I so enjoy the way that you tell so many different stories in different ways! xx

ifthethunderdontgetya™³²®© said...

Very good, Linda!
~

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