Wednesday, October 7, 2015

Landscape Challenges

Thanks to all who stopped by to join in last Wednesday! September is fading fast!

Here's hoping some of you, my faithful readers, might join me in posting a story with a picture for Wednesday Wit and Wisdom.  The challenge is to post a picture on your blog, then write a short story or a poem about the picture as a writing exercise.  When you have your blog written, you can link up for others to read.  Feel free to also add your picture and story to another link of your choice. The link up is on my WWW page here. This is #38!



Wondrous variety in building and landscaping appear across our small city. The trend now is to avoid water-consuming grass and plants and to look for Texas native plants that survive on less water and still produce stunning landscapes. Rock for all types of landscape designs is available everywhere, even two feet under the soil in your own yard! Note also the tin roof, designed for longer wear. The rock fence is about five feet tall, set in with concrete mortar. The reddish color is red granite, a finer gravel. Larger stone is probably Llano river rock and consists of several colors and types of rock, including some quartz that sparkles in the sun. The boulders are probably 200-300 pounds and are usually moved with the help of a bobcat with a bucket.

Behind the house you will find a water retention tank, probably holding up to 500 gallons of water. The metal roof sends rain into the gutters and then into the tank. The water is used to water those native plants that only require water sparingly. 

We have incorporated much of this in our own landscape design. All of the plants we have now planted are native and drought resistant. I'll have some pictures for you soon of our progress. What about your area? Do you need to conserve water? Is xeroscape landscaping becoming popular in your area?

Now it's your turn. Select a picture for your blog that tells a story, post it along with your story, then come back and link in to share with others. This is a writing challenge!

Linda Kay

13 comments:

Gail said...

I have tried to have low maintenance plants and you know I love rocks!

Have a blessed day.

eViL pOp TaRt said...

Low-maintenance lawns are the wave of the future. Great going!

eViL pOp TaRt said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Cranberry Morning said...

That's a lot of work, moving that much rock! So smart to use drought-resistant, native plants in your landscaping. When we moved here, we dug up the whole area because of the additions onto our house (in almost every direction) and were left with bare soil. Before we could get grass planted, native grasses had sprung up. By the time Mr. C. wanted to plant grass, I wouldn't let him. It's green. Leave it alone! So we have wonderful native, drought-resistant grasses in our yard. Of course they don't look like the gorgeous manicured lawns that others have, but when other yards are turning brown and dying, ours comes back - time after time. This year, however, we've had rain at least a couple times a week, which has been fantastic for the garden!

Have a wonderful Wednesday!

Mike said...

My landscaping challenge is as follows. Get up Mike. Ehhhh maybe a little later. Maybe tomorrow.

Tom said...

Xeriscaping is coming more necessary.

Gosia k said...

lovely place to live

William Kendall said...

Here it's not an issue. The roof however reminds me of some of the steel roofs we see here- they're easier for snow to naturally slide off of instead of shingles, which creates less of a worry in heavy snow winters about snow build up on roofs.

The Yum List said...

Yes, I think this is a very wise trend - local plants are adapted to the habitat and shouldn't cause as much strain on the natural environment. It makes sense.

Rory Bore said...

We are so very fortunate to live in a place that has an abundance of fresh, clean water. I am pretty sure it will never go dry up here. My little town sits surrounded by 3 different rivers (one big, two smaller) and there are many lakes within the region. We never go too long without rain. Still, we do try to conserve our water, and I use my rain barrel as much as possible to water my garden in the summer. Our garden season of course is fairly short, so we only require the extra water for a couple of months.
But I love this look. Even with all our water, I think I would still do something like this in on area of my yard. I think it looks so great.

John's Island said...

Hi Linda Kay, I always enjoy reading your stories but I'm not so good at telling them myself. Hope all is well with you down in Texas. Thanks for your kind comments on my blog. Have a good weekend ahead.

Marie C said...

Very nice post! A lot like our desert landscaping! Sorry I didn't contribute anything this week. After being gone on vacation and then having my computer crash, I've been slow getting back into gear, and I also have been working a lot on my book, so I couldn't think of switching to something else. I enjoy the writing exercises and I wish more people would participate. It's a fun meme. I

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Linda, sounds good. I'd like to have a way to capture rain, even just one barrel. But then I've read that the rain picks up toxins from the roof and should only be used on non-edible plants. I guess I could use it on a few things; it only *seems* like all we have is fruit trees!

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