Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Texas Longhorns-Wednesday Wit and Wisdom

Welcome back to Wednesday Wit and Wisdom. You will find all about this meme and the instructions hereThe purpose of this link up is to help us share some stories we might have milling about in our minds as we look at particular photos.  Many of us have mentioned that we could "write a story" about a photo of a barn, an old store, or an abandoned residence we have found or shown to others. I thought it would be fun to find a photo and write a short story.  You can add a bit of "wit" or "wisdom" if you like. Give it a try and join in!

Ever hear the story of the Texas Longhorn.....here's my picture for today.

This is me, Daisy, with my manager at one of our gigs at Luckenbach, TX. I have a saddle on for kids to sit on my back while he takes a picture for them. I guess this money keeps me in oats and grass, right? Sometimes we walk in parades all around the area. 

We Texas Longhorns were brought to the US by Christopher Columbus. You will notice my long horns, which can range from an expanse of six feet to over seven feet from tip to tip. I have so many relatives with very different coloring from my brown and white hide. The varieties of color ranged from bluish-grey, and various yellowish hues, to browns, black, ruddy and white, both cleanly bright and dirty-speckled. Do you use ancestry.com to track your family? I'm not quite adept at using the computer, so had to resort to Wikipedia for some background. 

Apparently my ancestors were left to roam around in this hot country, so we became pretty drought and heat tolerant over the years back in the 1700s and 1800s. I'm told other cattle were more popular than my ancestors, as we weren't the beefy breeds of some of the others.

We became pretty popular in the state, when the University of Texas adopted my great-great-great grandfather Bevo as their logo and mascot back in 1917 for the sports teams.


 J. Frank Dobie and others gathered small herds to keep in Texas state parks. They were cared for largely as curiosities, but the stock's longevity, resistance to disease and ability to thrive on marginal pastures quickly revived the breed as beef stock and for their link to Texas history. Texas Longhorns with elite genetics can often fetch $40,000 or more at auction with the record of $170,000 in recent history for a cow.
Commercial ranchers cross-breed longhorns with other breeds for increasing hybrid vigor and easy calving characteristics. Smaller birth weights reduce dystocia for first-calf heifers.
Due to their innate gentle disposition and intelligence, Texas Longhorns are also increasingly being trained as riding steers, which is where I come in. I have to tell you my horns are sometimes a nuisance, as I can't get to the grass that's always greener on the other side of the fence!
Please click on the Wikipedia link to learn more about the Longhorns. Now it's your turn. Find a picture that speaks to you and write a story or poem, or do a bit of research. Put it on your blog, then link back here to share your story.
Linda Kay

16 comments:

Denise inVA said...

A fun and interesting way to learn about the Texas Longhorn. Great job!

eViL pOp TaRt said...

A nice factual story, ably narrated by Daisy. Nice story!

Lowcarb team member said...

Well done Linda - I enjoyed how you presented this, thank you.

All the best Jan

Gosia k said...

They are amazing creatures

Gosia k said...

They are amazing creatures

William Kendall said...

They're formidable animals!

Marie C said...

I was stunned...the part about Columbus bringing them over! Can you imagine a longhorn on one of those tiny ships? Even ONE would have been a difficult transfer across the ocean, unless they just brought a few young ones who didn't have their horns yet! And how did they get from the Caribbean to mainstream N America? It's all very intriguing!

I have to apologize to you....I thought you had given up Wednesday Wit & Wisdom. I also have been horrible about catching up with people on the blogs and I haven't been by to see your posts lately either. I am going through some real upheaval right now and have had to turn my back on my writing temporarily, as well as being on the computer much. Our daughter & sil drove out of here yesterday morning headed to Oregon and their household move involved me quite a bit, trying to help our daughter before her hubby came back to facilitate the actual move. She & grandson had to pack up the whole house, so I was there to help out as much as I could. Now I have to pack my entire house (hubby is disabled) though my health keeps me from doing so much, and I have about five months to do it. You can see why I've had to focus on that. But I will visit when I can. And after our move, if you are still doing Wit & Wisdom, I would love to join in! Hope you had a great Easter!

Tom said...

now here's a sight that I won't see in my neck of the woods

Beatrice Euphemie said...

I enjoyed this story, Linda, as I knew nothing about the 'Daisy's' of the world. I've seen very few of these amazing animals here in WA, although there was a small herd in a field near here many years ago (dark gray with speckles). So interesting that they came from Columbus, and were able to survive and multiply. A wonderful symbol of Texas! x Karen

HOOTIN ANNI said...

Quite a while ago, I remember reading about a record breaking length of horns....don't recall if it was a longhorn breed or not tho. Let me see if I can find it on Google...I'll be back shortly.

HOOTIN ANNI said...

Okay, I remembered the bull's name....from the program Dallas. It was called J R, so it was pretty easy to re-find.

Here is the link. The horns measured 9 feet 1 inch.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2100885/Longest-horns-world-Texas-Longhorn-bull-JR-Australia.html

Nonnie said...

To think I have lived in Texas for 46 years, our daughter graduated from UT, and our son-in-law is a Longhorn fanatic, and I. Never. Knew. That!

McGuffy Ann Morris said...

Oh, this is a great story, Linda. Thank you for sharing it.

Betsy Adams said...

I spent 12 years in Texas... Loved my time there. My favorite thing was to drive to the hill country and see the Texas Bluebonnets..... We'd go to Chapel Hill, Brenham and around that area every single April I lived there. Also loved the Painted Churches..

Hugs,
Betsy

Rory Bore said...

Having spent a good deal of my life around Holstein and Jersey cattle on the farm, I find the Longhorns so unique and fascinating.
I wonder if our cows would have any stories to tell? Probably be about all those times they got into the corn field at night. :)

Lin Floyd said...

thanks for sharing, my hubby graduated from Univ of Texas om Austin. So he loves the longhorns...lol!

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